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St Andrews Kant Reading Party; 16 – 19 July

It is our pleasure to invite you to the St Andrews Kant Reading Party 2018: Kant and Rawls.
The reading party is an annually recurring academic retreat aimed at bringing together
scholars of various backgrounds and career stages to discuss and compare the works of
Immanuel Kant and another prominent philosopher. The eleventh edition of the event will
be held at The Burn in Angus (http://theburn.goodenough.ac.uk/) from July 16-19, 2018.
Thematically, our focus will be on the practical philosophy of Kant and John Rawls. Our aim
is to illuminate the complex relation between the two philosophers, and thereby to gain new
and deeper insights into some of the important moral and political issues of our time.
The Kant Reading Party is open to all. It involves a combination of discussion sessions,
which are based on pre-circulated readings, and paper sessions, which give graduate
students a chance to present work relevant to the theme of the event.
We invite graduate students to submit anonymised abstracts of no more than 750 words by
the 13 th of May. Note that students whose abstracts are selected for presentation are waived
the entire participation fee.
Non-presenting participants are invited to register by the 31 st of May. The estimated
participation fees are £140 for faculty members and £70 for students.
For more information on the event, as well as detailed instructions on how to submit
abstracts and register for participation, please visit our website at
https://standrewskantcolloquium.wordpress.com/kant-reading- party/ and our philevents
page at https://philevents.org/event/show/61314
With best wishes,
The organisers: Janis Schaab, Lucas Sierra Vélez, Prof. Kate Moran, Prof. Jens Timmermann
The St Andrews Kant Reading Party 2018 is made possible by the support of the Centre for
Academic, Professional and Organisational Development at the University of St Andrews,
the Scots Philosophical Association, and the UK Kant Society.
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/capod/

Home


https://sites.google.com/site/ukkantsociety/

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Scottish Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy IX; Aberdeen, 24-25 May

Scottish Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy IX

SCOTTISH SEMINAR IN EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY

University of Aberdeen 24-25 May 2018

The Sir Duncan Rice Library, Seminar Room 224.

Key note speakers:

Felicity Green (University of Edinburgh)

Martin Lenz (University of Groningen)

 All are welcome to attend. Attendance is free, but registration is mandatory on our Eventbrite page: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/scottish-seminar-in-early-modern-philosophy-ix-tickets-43171342648

PROGRAMME

Thursday 24 May

9.00-9.15 Coffee and Welcome

9.15-10.00 Brenda Basilico (University of Lille III), “Music, Mathematics, and Skepticism in Mersenne’s Writings”

10.00-10.45 Margaret Matthews (Emory University, Atlanta), “The Place of Skepticism in Montaigne’s Essays.” 

10.45-11.00 Break

11.00-12.00 Key Note SpeakerFelicity Green (University of Edinburgh), “Freedom and Responsibility in Locke’s Account of Belief.”

12.00-13.30 Lunch

13.30-14.15 Raphael Krut-Landau (University of Pennsylvania), “From History to Anagogy: Scriptural Modes of Reading in Spinoza’s Ethics.”

14.15-15.00 Sanja Särman (Hong Kong University), “Don’t Know Yourself – Spinoza and Leibniz on the Advantages of Having an Infinitely Unfamiliar Mind.”

15.00-15.15 Break

15.15-16.00 James A. Harris (University of St Andrews), “Hume on political obligation: between Locke and Filmer.”

16.00-17.45 Jacob Hinze (University of St. Andrews), “Indeterminacies in Locke’s Concept of the State of Nature.” (SSEMP Essay Prize Winner, funded by the BSHP)

Friday 25 May

9.00-9.15 Coffee

9.15-10.00 David Bartha (Central European University), “Two Routes to Idealism: Collier and Berkeley.”

10.00-10.45 Umrao Sethi (Lehman College, CUNY), “Mind-Dependence in Berkeley and the Problem of Perception.”

10.45-11.00 Break

11.00-12.00 Key Note SpeakerMartin Lenz (University of Groningen), “What does it mean to share a view? Hume on the Transmission of Mental States. “

12.00-13.30 Lunch

13.30-14.15 Dino Jakusic (University of Warwick), “Christian Wolff and the Invention of Ontology.”

14.15-15.00 Gaston Robert (King’s College London), “God, Aggregation, and the Collective Unity of All Substances: General Pre-Established Harmony Revisited.”

15.00-15.15 Break

15.15-16.00 Keith Green (East Tennessee State University), “Hatred, Moral Motivation, and ‘Normativity’ in Spinoza and Hume”

16.00-16.45 Gabriel Watts (Oriel College, Oxford), “The Curious Place of Curiosity in Hume’s Theory of the Passions.”

Attendance is free, but registration is mandatory. Please up on Eventbrite: Scottish Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy IX: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/scottish-seminar-in-early-modern-philosophy-ix-tickets-43171342648

 Contact: Mogens Lærke: mogenslaerke@hotmail.com

Organisation: Beth Lord (Aberdeen); Mogens Lærke (IHRIM, CNRS, ENS de Lyon)

Funding: Scottish Philosophical Association (SPA) / British Society for the History of Philosophy (BSHP) / University of Aberdeen / IHRIM (CNRS, UMR 5317), ENS de Lyon.

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Visiting scholars at Dundee (Alexander Galloway and Marcia Sa Cavalcante Schuback); 14 – 27 May

The Scottish Centre for Continental Philosophy at the University of Dundee is pleased to announce a series of special events by visiting scholars Alexander Galloway and Marcia Sa Cavalcante Schuback, running from the 14th to the 27th of May 2018. These events are made possible by the support of the Scots Philosophical Association.
All events are free to attend.
 
Our first visiting fellow is Alexander R. Galloway, 14–19 May
 
First Masterclass: The Concept of the Digital
Monday 14 May4-6 pm, room 2S12, Dalhousie Building.
 
Second Masterclass: The Concept of the Analog
Tuesday 15 May, 4-6pm, room 2S12, Dalhousie Building.
 
Evening Lecture: How Did the Computer Learn to See?
Wednesday 16 May, 4-6 pm, Meeting Room, Dundee Contemporary Arts
 
 
Our second visiting fellow is Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback21-27 May
 
Three Masterclasses: Time in Exile – About the Struggle for Presence
First Masterclass: Monday 21 May4-6 pm, Room 2G13 Dalhousie Building
Second Masterclass: Tuesday 22 May4-6 pm, Room 2G13 Dalhousie Building
Third Masterclass: Wednesday 23 May4-6 pm, Room 2G13 Dalhousie Building
 
Evening Lecture: Thinking through Sketches
Thursday 24 May4-6pm, Meeting Room, Dundee Contemporary Arts
 
 
For further information, including abstracts and speaker biographies, see https://scot-cont-phil.org/home-page/activities/
 
 
Enquiries may be sent to Amélie Berger Soraruff: a.a.l.bergersoraruff@dundee.ac.uk
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Mathematical Collaboration II; St Andrews, 7 and 8 April

From Fenner Tanswell & Josh Habgood-Coote:

Hi everyone,

On Saturday the 7th and Sunday the 8th of April, the University of St Andrews are hosting a workshop entitled “Mathematical Collaboration II” in room 104, Edgecliffe The Scores, St Andrews. This is a joint workshop with the Social Machines of Mathematics project in Oxford led by Prof Ursula Martin.

The event website can be found here:
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/arche/event/group-knowledge-and-mathematical-collaboration-workshop-ii/

I shall also include the schedule and abstracts below.

The purpose is to look at social epistemology for mathematics, with a focus on how mathematicians collaborate. We’ve gone out of our way to make this interdisciplinary and to interact with practising mathematicians, argumentation theorists, historians and ethnographers, so we’re hoping to see some exciting discussion, especially with a panel discussion featuring local mathematicians and historians of mathematics.

I encourage everyone that is interested to come along. There is no registration fee, but it would be very helpful to let us know if you intend to so that we can get a feel for the numbers. If you would like to join us for dinner at Maisha, please let me know too (though we cannot cover the cost of this from the budget).

We gratefully acknowledge funding from both the Scots Philosophical Association and the EPSRC.

All the best,

Fenner Tanswell & Josh Habgood-Coote

ft34@st-andrews.ac.uk

josh.habgood-coote@bristol.ac.uk

SCHEDULE
Saturday 7th April

9:30-10.45 Talk: Josh Habgood-Coote (Bristol) What is the point of authorship?

10.45-11.15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:30 Talk: Benedikt Loewe (Hamburg/Amsterdam) Training future researchers studying mathematical practices and cultures

12:30-1:30 LUNCH

1:30-2:00 Presentation: Kamilla Rekvenyi (St Andrews) Paul Erd?s’s Mathematics as a Social Activity

2:00-2:10 Brief break

2:10-3:25 Talk: Stephen Crowley (Boise State) Does Collaboration make Mathematicians Virtuous?

3:25-3:50 Coffee Break

3:50-5:00 Panel Session on mathematical collaboration: Peter Cameron, Adam Dunn, Isobel Falconer, Louis Theran

7:00 Conference Dinner (Maisha)

Sunday 8th April


9:30-10.45 Talk: Colin Rittberg (VUB Brussels) & Fenner Tanswell (St Andrews) Epistemic Injustice in Mathematics (joint work with Jean Paul van Bendegem)

10.45-11.15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:30 Talk: Joe Corneli (Edinburgh) Argumentation theory for mathematical argument

12:30-1:30 LUNCH

1:30-2:45 Chris Kelp (Glasgow) tbc

2:45-3:15 Coffee Break

3:15-4:15 Talk: Katie McCallum (Brighton) Situating Mathematical Communication: An Artist’s Ethnography of Research Mathematics

4:20-5:30 Talk: Ursula Martin (Oxford)  Beyond inference, and towards impact: taking forward the study of mathematical collaboration.

ABSTRACTS

 

Title- What is the point of authorship?

Josh Habgood-Coote (Bristol)

 

Abstract. Getting to important results in mathematics often takes the intellectual efforts of many people, each offering different kinds of contribution, as we can see in the polymath project, the classification of finite simple groups, and  everyday collaborations. When it comes to writing up collaborative work, the collaborators face the  vexed question of who should be included on the author line. Researchers in a number of disciplines — most saliently high-energy physics and biomedicine — have worried about this question, putting forward various proposals for authorship attributions. In this paper, I will offer a different angle on this debate, thinking about the different functions played by authorship attributions, and suggesting that disciplines might do better by replacing the notion of authorship with a pluralist account that distinguishes contributors, writers and guarantors.

Title – Does Collaboration make Mathematicians Virtuous?
Stephen Crowley (Boise State University)

Abstract – The aim of this paper is to consider the ‘fit’ of two important recent views about knowledge making communities. On the one hand the importance of collaboration is becoming increasingly clear, on the other the notion of virtue is being appealed to more frequently as a way to understand the norms of practice of such communities. So far so good – but can we fit collaboration into a virtue based approach, and if not what follows? Mathematics, in addition to its intrinsic interest, is a great case study for thinking about this issue because i) its deeply collaborative and ii) its norms will be almost purely epistemic – no Human Subjects protocols to complicate things – as such a great deal of recent work from virtue epistemology can be ‘imported’ in a relatively straightforward fashion. I’ll suggest here that collaboration is a poor fit with the virtue framework and that the implications of this are that our thinking about the nature of knowledge making communities is still too individualistic.

Situating Mathematical Communication: An Artist’s Ethnography of Research Mathematics
Katie McCallum (Brighton University)

Mathematics is often characterised as existing above and outside of our social and material world. Through ethnographic observation and creative and linguistic analysis I am undertaking to build up a picture of mathematical communication and even solo work as inextricably bound up with rich material and social resources, and its progress dependent on their successful deployment. Written analysis moves in parallel with creative sculptural experimentation in order to do justice to the material element emphasised in this research.

I will be talking about the results of my observations of nine mathematicians in the UK, USA and Europe, combining a cognitivist theory of communication with situated mind ideas in an effort to explain why it is that the study of mathematics takes the particular forms that it does in the world. These forms have developed and been maintained in dialogue with our limited, very human cognitive architecture, and understanding how this is the case might demonstrate that ideas about mind-environment systems have insight to offer in even the most ostensibly disembodied areas of human endeavour.

Title: Training future researchers studying mathematical practices and cultures
Benedikt Löwe

Abstract. The research field studying mathematical research practices and cultures (also known as “philosophy of mathematical practice”) uses methods from the empirical social sciences to study mathematical research practices and in particular cultural variations between different research practices and their effect on mathematics. Sociologists of science are well-equipped with an ample toolbox of methods to do studies like this, but traditionally, they have shown a “peculiar mixture of awe and lack of interest” in mathematics (Heintz, 2000). As a consequence, philosophers of mathematical practice have to follow in the footsteps of experimental philosophers and become empirical scientists themselves. In this talk, I report on a graduate-level course taught at the Universiteit van Amsterdam to train philosophers of logic, science, and mathematics for doing empirical research relevant for the philosophy of mathematical practice.

Title:  Paul Erd?s’s Mathematics as a Social Activity
Kamilla Rekvenyi (St Andrews)

Abstract.  This presentation investigates the collaborative mathematical practice of Paul Erd?s. It raises the question of whether communal mathematics, or mathematics as a social activity, can lead to individual success. It draws on new primary sources in both English and Hungarian.

I will look at Erd?s’s social mathematics from several angles. Firstly, I will analyse his collaborations and heritage, and the ways he had for finding the ideal mathematician to work with him on each problem. Then I discuss two contrasting case studies: his influence on young mathematicians as exemplified by Kenneth Falconer; and the Erd?s-Selberg collaboration on the elementary proof of the prime number theorem, which ended in dispute. Neither of these collaborations resulted in individual success for Erd?s, but both furthered, what may have been his main aim: solving beautiful mathematical problems.

Title: Argumentation theory for mathematical argument  (joint work with Ursula Martin, Dave Murray-Rust, Gabriela Rino Nesin, Alison Pease)
Joe Corneli (Edinburgh)

Abstract: To adequately model mathematical arguments the analyst must be able to represent the mathematical objects under discussion and the relationships between them, as well as inferences drawn about these objects and relationships as the discourse unfolds.  A paper recently submitted to the journal Argumentation introduces a framework with these properties, which has been applied to both mathematical dialogues and expository texts.  (Preprint  available: http://arxiv.org/abs/1803.06500 )

Title: Epistemic Injustice in Mathematics

Colin Rittberg (VUB) & Fenner Tanswell (St Andrews) joint work with Jean Paul van Bendegem (VUB)

Abstract: We investigate how epistemic injustice can manifest in mathematical practices. We do this as both asocial epistemological and virtue-theoretic investigation of mathematical practices. We delineate the concept both positively – we show that folk theorems can be a source of epistemic injustice in mathematics – and negatively by exploring cases where the obstacles to participation in a mathematical practice do not amount to epistemic injustice. Having explored what epistemic injustice in mathematics can amount to, we use the concept to highlight a potential danger of intellectual enculturation. (Let me know if you’d like a copy of this paper.)

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final reminder: Papineau and Pettigrove *today*

Final reminder:  David Papineau is giving our keynote address today at 11 AM in the Dugald Stewart Building 3.10.  Catered lunch at 12:30 on the 7th floor of DSB.  Glen Pettigrove is giving our final talk at 1:30 in 3.10 DSB.

We hope to see you there!

 

10:30 AM: Coffee (7th floor of Dugald Stewart Building)

11:00 AM: Keynote Address: David Papineau (KCL), “Kinds and Essences” (3.10/3.11 Dugald Stewart Building)

12:30 PM: Lunch (provided; 7th floor Dugald Stewart Building)

1:30 PM: Glen Pettigrove (Glasgow), “Character and Role” (3.10/3.11 Dugald Stewart Building)

The Dugald Stewart Building is located on Bristo Square in Edinburgh.  More information about the building (including accessibility information) can be found here.

 

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SPA AGM and Conference [next week]: Edinburgh 7&8 December; info. and register for dinner

Dear Scottish Philosophers,

The SPA AGM and Conference is coming up next week on Thursday/Friday 7 and 8 December in Edinburgh.  The conference program is below (with a few minor updates).  If you would like to attend the conference dinner (likely cost: £15 – £20), please email me at scotsphil@gmail.com by Tuesday 5 December. The dinner location will be Namaste Kathmandu (17 Forrest Rd).  If you would simply like to attend the conference, it would be great if you could let me know, but don’t feel pressure, and do feel free to simply turn up on the day.  Note: all Scottish PG students welcome!

Patrick Todd (Secretary)

__

Thursday 7 December

1:30 PM: Coffee and meet and greet (7th floor of Dugald Stewart Building)

2:00 PM: AGM Business meeting (SPA members only)  (3.10/3.11 Dugald Stewart Building)

3:30 PM: Michela Massimi (Edinburgh): “Modelling Possibilities” (3.10/3.11 Dugald Stewart Building)

5:00 PM: Drinks reception (7th floor Dugald Stewart Building)

6:45 PM: Dinner at Namaste Kathmandu (email Secretary to register)

 

Friday 8 December:

10:30 AM: Coffee/pastries (7th floor of Dugald Stewart Building)

11:00 AM: Keynote Address: David Papineau (KCL), “Kinds and Essences” (3.10/3.11 Dugald Stewart Building)

12:30 PM: Lunch (provided; 7th floor Dugald Stewart Building)

1:30 PM: Glen Pettigrove (Glasgow), “Character and Role” (3.10/3.11 Dugald Stewart Building)

The Dugald Stewart Building is located on Bristo Square in Edinburgh.  More information about the building (including accessibility information) can be found here.

 

 

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KBNS Workshop, Stirling, 18-19 December

KBNS Network Workshop 1

Self-Knowledge and the A Priori

18th-19th December 2017, Stirling Court Hotel, University of Stirling

The Workshop is open to all, and there is no registration fee, but please register by emailing Sonia Roca-Royes at sr22@stir.ac.uk.

For more information, please visit: http://kbns.stirlingphilosophy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/KBNS_Network_Wshop_1.pdf

Draft Programme

Monday 18th December

10.00 – 11.30         Åsa Wikforss (Stockholm): Knowledge of Belief and the Asymmetry Thesis

11.30 – 11.45         Coffee

11.45 – 1.15           Indrek Lobus (Stirling): TBA

1.15 – 2.15             Lunch

2.15 – 3.45             Rob Rupert (Colorado): TBA

3.45 – 4.00             Break

4.00 – 5.30             Giovanni Merlo (Stirling): The metaphysical problem of other minds

5.30 – 6.30             Buffet Dinner

6.30 – 8.30             2nd KBNS PUBLIC LECTURE: Åsa Wikforss (Stockholm):

Fact resistance: what is it, and how can it be cured?

 

Tuesday 19th December

10.00 – 11.30         Annalisa Coliva (UCI):   Disagreeing with myself. Rationality, Moore’s paradox and belief revision

11.30 – 11.45         Coffee

11.45 – 1.15           Joshua Thurow (UTSA): Understanding to the Rescue

1.15 – 2.15             Lunch

2.15 – 3.45             Lucy O’Brien (UCL): TBA

3.45 – 4.00             Break

4.00 – 5.30             Giacomo Melis (Stirling): Brute errors and warranting roles (of experience)

7.00                        Dinner: Stirling Court Hotel

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SPA AGM and Conference: 7 & 8 December, Edinburgh, with Papineau, Massimi, and Pettigrove

SPA AGM and Conference Schedule; Edinburgh 7&8 December:
Thursday 7 December (3.10/3.11 Dugald Stewart Building)
1:30 PM: Coffee, biscuits, meet and greet
2:00 PM: AGM Business Meeting (SPA members only)
3:30 PM: Michela Massimi (Edinburgh), “Modelling Possibilities” 
5:00 PM: Drinks reception (wine, etc.) (7th floor of Dugald Stewart Building)
6:45 PM: Dinner (email Secretary to register)
Friday 8 December (all events in 3.10/3.11 Dugald Stewart Building)
10:30 AM: Coffee, pastries
11:00 AM: Keynote Address: David Papineau (KCL), “Kinds and Essences”
12:30 PM: Lunch
1:30 PM: Glen Pettigrove (Glasgow), “Character and Role” 
3:00 PM: Finish
The Dugald Stewart Building is located on Bristo Square in Edinburgh.  More information about the building (including accessibility information) can be found here.
I can recommend accommodation options to anyone seeking advice; however, there are a host of options in Edinburgh nearby.
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SPA AGM and Conference: 7 & 8 December, Edinburgh, with Papineau, Massimi, and Pettigrove

Dear All,
I’m happy to announce more details on the upcoming SPA AGM in Edinburgh on Thursday/Friday 7 and 8 December.  David Papineau (KCL) is our keynote, and Michela Massimi (Edinburgh) and Glen Pettigrove (Glasgow) are also speaking.  Titles to be given in an update.
There is no registration fee, but please email me at scotsphil@gmail.com to register for the conference.  Please indicate whether you would like to attend the dinner (likely cost: £15 – £20).
Best,
Patrick
__
Thursday 7 December (3.10/3.11 Dugald Stewart Building)
1:30 PM: Coffee, biscuits, meet and greet
2:00 PM: AGM Business Meeting (SPA members only)
3:30 PM: Michela Massimi (Edinburgh)
5:00 PM: Drinks reception (wine, etc.) (7th floor of Dugald Stewart Building)
6:45 PM: Dinner
Friday 8 December (all events in 3.10/3.11 Dugald Stewart Building)
10:30 AM: Coffee, pastries
11:00 AM: Keynote Address: David Papineau (KCL)
12:30 PM: Lunch
1:30 PM: Glen Pettigrove (Glasgow)
3:00 PM: Finish
The Dugald Stewart Building is located on Bristo Square in Edinburgh.  More information about the building (including accessibility information) can be found here.
I can recommend accommodation options to anyone seeking advice; however, there are a host of options in Edinburgh nearby.
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The Glasgow – Melbourne Formal Philosophy Workshop, 10/11 November, Glasgow

The Glasgow – Melbourne Formal Philosophy Workshop 2017 will take place at Dept of Philosophy, 69 Oakfield Avenue, University of Glasgow, on Friday 10th and Saturday 11th November.
Speakers:  Berta Grimau (Glasgow), Stephan Kraemer (Glasgow), Stephan Leuenberger (Glasgow), Greg Restall (Melbourne),  Martin Smith (Edinburgh), Shawn Standefer (Melbourne), Bruno Whittle (Texas Tech), Gareth Young (Glasgow).
The workshop is supported by the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne, the University of Glasgow, and the AHRC Whole Truth project
https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/humanities/research/philosophyresearch/researchprojects/thewholetruth/

Attendance is free but please contact Adam.Rieger@glasgow.ac.uk if intending to come.

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Kant’s Scots, Edinburgh 3rd November

Kant’s Scots
Bi-annual workshop on Kant’s philosophy
Friday 3rd November 2017
Room 4.01, Dugald Stewart Building, 3 Charles Street, Edinburgh, EH8 9AD
 
Program:
10h00-11h30
Michela Massimi (Edinburgh): Imaginary standpoints and Perspectival knowledge in Kant
11h45-12h45
Kristina Kersa (St Andrews): Transcendental unity of apperception and moral will
14h00-15h30
Angela Breitenbach (Cambridge): Kant and the unity of science debate
15h45-17h15
Andrew Cooper (UCL): The legacies of Kant’s Critique of Judgment
Organiser: Alix Cohen (alix.cohen@ed.ac.uk)
No registration necessary
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Hermeneutics of Practice at Dundee, 27 October

Hermeneutics of Practice

Date: Friday 27 October 2017

Venue: University of Dundee, Dalhousie Building, Room 2S12 (10-1PM) & Room 2F14 (1-4PM)

The Hermeneutics of Practice is an Art and Philosophy symposium hosted by the School of Humanities. The themes it will investigate will be in honour of Professor Nicholas Davey, who retired from the University of Dundee in 2017. The speakers we have invited, including guest speakers from the University of Westminster and Lancaster University, have previously worked with Nicholas Davey, and are leading experts on contemporary creative practices. Topics to be explored include: what is an artistic practice? How do philosophy and art intertwine when considering notions of practice? How might the notion of hermeneutics aid us when it comes to understanding (artistic) practice?

Tea and coffee will be served in the afternoon, and attendance is free. Please note the change of rooms in the morning and afternoon sessions.

 

Morning Session (10-1PM): 2S12 Dalhousie

10.00-10.30 Phillip Braham: ‘In Time, and silently’

10.30-11.00 Linda Bolsakova: ‘The weather conditions for practice’

11.00-12.00 Kerstin May: ‘The Discipline of Art’

12-1.00 Lunch Break

Afternoon Session (1-4PM): 2F14 Dalhousie

1.00-2.00 Nicholas Davey: ‘“I only wanted to say something practical!”  On learning from Practice’

2.00-2.30 Andrew Roberts: ‘Philosophical Hermeneutics and Creative Reading’

2.30-3.00 Tea and Coffee Break 

3.00-4.00 Ian Heywood: ‘Art Practice: Supplements and Contexts’

All are welcome!

Contact: Ashley Woodward: a.z.woodward@dundee.ac.uk

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Scottish Aesthetics Forum, Edinburgh, 2 November, Dr Angela Breitenbach

The Scottish Aesthetics Forum is delighted to announce its next lecture:

Dr Angela Breitenbach (Cambridge)

“Aesthetic reflection and scientific understanding”

Thursday, 2 November, 2017, 4:15 – 6:00pm

Room 7.01, Dugald Stewart Building,

University of Edinburgh

The lecture is free and open to all!

Abstract: “Scientists routinely speak of the aesthetic merit of theories, proofs and explanations, often regarding the experience of beauty and elegance in science as a motivation for their work and an indication of its truth. But aesthetic judgments in science are as controversial as they are widespread. On one side, aestheticians have worried that statements about the beauty of a theory or the elegance of a proof are merely metaphorical and lack genuine aesthetic status. On the other side, philosophers of science have wondered why aesthetic concerns should play any role in the search for scientific knowledge. I address this two-fold challenge by asking how judgments of beauty could be both aesthetic and relevant for scientific enquiry. I propose an answer inspired by the Kantian idea that aesthetic experience is grounded, at least in part, in the subject’s spontaneous intellectual activities. I argue that relevant aesthetic judgments are grounded in the subject’s awareness of her creative intellectual activities in devising and grasping a theory. And I suggest that judgments of this kind may offer a heuristic tool for scientific enquiry by indicating achievements of understanding.”

About the speaker: Angela Breitenbach is a Lecturer in philosophy at King’s College at the University of Cambridge. Her work includes Kantian conceptions of aesthetics and beauty in science and mathematics, the relationship between laws and unity, causality and causal knowledge, as well as Kantian perspectives on biology and nature, among other things. Along with being a Fellow at King’s College, she’s also a ProFutura Fellow at CRASSH and a Pro Futura Scientia Fellow at the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study. She’s recently done a TEDx Talk called “Can theories be beautiful?” which is available on YouTube.

Additional information: The lecture will be followed by a dinner with our speaker. If you would like to attend the dinner, please contact the organisers by 26 October.

*** There are limited funds to cover dinner expenses for two students, offered on a first-come-first-served basis. ***

Don’t miss our upcoming events!

7 December 2017 – Michael Newall (Kent) and

24 January 2018 – Kathleen Stock (Sussex)

– To contact the organisers: scottishaestheticsforum@gmail.com.

– For more information: http://www.saf.ppls.ed.ac.uk

– Or find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/scottishaestheticsforum
and Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/scottishaestheticsforum

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SPA Annual General Meeting, 7/8 December, Edinburgh

Reminder: the SPA Annual General Meeting  is held in early December every year, rotating between the SPA member departments.  This year the SPA  will be hosted by Edinburgh on Thursday/Friday December 7 and 8.  I’ll be posting a full schedule soon; in the meantime please mark your calendars.
Patrick
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Symposium on Rights, 23 October, Stirling

On Monday 23rd October there will be a symposium on themes from Rowan Cruft’s forthcoming Human Rights, Ownership, and the Individual (OUP).  There is a growing literature on the philosophy of human rights that rarely engages with earlier work on the nature of rights, or on property’s canonical place in the history of rights theory. This symposium brings together legal, moral, and political philosophers to consider these issues in relation to Rowan Cruft’s forthcoming book.  For more information, see http://joseph-bowen.weebly.com/symposium-on-human-rights-ownership-and-the-individual.html

 

Speakers: Rowan Cruft (Stirling), Tom Dougherty (Cambridge), Katrin Flikschuh (LSE), Zofia Stemplowska (Oxford), and Victor Tadros (Warwick).
Venue: Room C1/2, Pathfoot Building, University of Stirling.
Time: Registration 9.30; talks begin at 10; the last talk will end at 5.
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“Law and the Whole Truth” workshop, Glasgow, August 10-11

“Law and the Whole Truth” Workshop: University of Glasgow, August 10-11, 2017. This interdisciplinary legal workshop presents and examines different perspectives relevant to the relationship between law and the “whole truth”. The workshop, introduced by Prof. Burkhard Schafer (University of Edinburgh), is divided into four sessions: 1) Information disclosure and the whole truth, 2) Defamation, perjury and the whole truth, 3) Law, neuroscience and the whole truth, and 4) Philosophical perspectives on law and the whole truth. Click here to learn more.

1) Information disclosure and the whole truth (10th August, 9.30-12.45)
Speakers:
– Dr Tracey Elliott (University of Leicester)
– Dr Ema Sullivan-Bissett (University of Birmingham)

2) Defamation, perjury and the whole truth (10th August, 2-4)
Speakers:
– Campbell Deane (Partner at BKF & Co, Glasgow)
– Prof. Alan Paterson (University of Strathclyde)

3) Law, neuroscience and the whole truth (11th August, 10.15-12.45)
Speakers:
– Prof. Francis Shen (University of Minnesota)
– Dr Neil Garrett (Princeton University)

4) Philosophical perspectives on law and the whole truth (11th August, 2-4.15)
Speakers:
– Prof. Paul Roberts (University of Nottingham)
– Dr Simon Barnes (University of Edinburgh)

For more details, please see the programme page.

This workshop will be of interest to solicitors working in a range of legal areas such as media law, medical negligence and criminal law. Certificates of attendance, for the purposes of CPD certification, will be available on request.

The workshop is part of the AHRC-funded “Whole Truth” project.

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Diaphora Workshop III: A priori Knowledge (Stirling, 6 – 8 September)

Diaphora Workshop III: A priori Knowledge

Stirling 6-8 September

Venue: Stirling Court Hotel, on campus

(http://stirlingphilosophy.org/diaphora/diaphora-workshop-iii/)

 

Keynote speakers:              Tim Williamson (Oxford) and Crispin Wright (NUY/Stirling)

Confirmed Speakers:         Ali Abasnezhad (Munich), Moritz Baron (Stirling), Michel Croce (Edinburgh), Jonathan Dittrich (Munich), Matt Jope (Edinburgh), Ásgeir Matthiasson (Stirling), Bryan Pickel (Edinburgh), Peter Sullivan (Stirling), Matheus Valente (Barcelona), Lisa Vogt (Barcelona).

 

The workshop will take place during the full days 6 and 7 September, with the training session for ESR’s scheduled for Friday 8 in the morning.

The workshop will finish on the 7 with a panel session with Tim Williamson, Crispin Wright and Adrian Haddock (Stirling) on how different conceptions of the aim of philosophy and epistemological theorizing explain lack of convergence. This session is aimed to focus on the unifying aim of Diaphora.

The panel session will be followed by the Workshop Dinner.

 

Please confirm attendance at your earliest convenience by email to Sonia-Roca Royes.

 

A full programme will be published here shortly.

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The Adam Smith Lecture in Jurisprudence; 26 May, Glasgow

The Adam Smith Lecture in Jurisprudence

The Adam Smith Lecture in Jurisprudence seeks to make productive in a contemporary context the distinctive approach of the Scottish Enlightenment to legal philosophy. The Lecture invites some of the world’s most distinguished legal and political philosophers whose ideas have reached out beyond narrow disciplinary boundaries, to shape innovative thinking on key philosophical, political and social aspects of law and government. It is envisaged that these lectures will form landmark moments in our understanding of contemporary debates on law and its place in an interconnected world.

2017 Lecture

T?he 2017 Adam Smith Lecture in Jurisprudence will take place on Friday 26 May.  The invited speaker is A J Julius (UCLA) who will be presenting on ‘Free production through and against property’.

The event will take place at 5:30pm, Humanities Lecture Hall, Main Building.  A drinks reception will follow the lecture.

Free Entry – All welcome

Abstract

This lecture will arrange for Locke, Rousseau, Smith, Kant, and Fichte to agree about property by arranging for them to agree with Karl Marx. The project of using what’s mine to make what’s mine is an attempt at producing freely. It fails: the general interdependence of individual production activity as it’s organized by private property is a mutual subjection. The attempt will succeed only when propertyless workers free themselves to work together on purpose.

More information: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adam-smith-lecture-in-jurisprudence-tickets-34573781110?aff=es2